A Post a Week in 2011


I want to blog more.
But instead of just thinking about it and saying it, I’m going to do it.
I will post to my blog at least once a week for all of 2011.

Now, I know why my blogging has tailed off in the past few years. When I first began blogging in 2004, there were fewer challengers to my time. But in the last few years, I’ve added social networking through Facebook, business networking through LinkedIn, microblogging through Twitter, and photoblogging through Tumblr.
I’ve graduated from a simple cellphone to an iPhone with all its distractions.
So, my blogging here dropped off.

This year, I’m taking the WordPress challenge. I’m making use of WordPress’ The Daily Post to help me along the way.

If I need help, I get to ask for it. If I can help someone else, I promise to volunteer.

I hope you encourage me with comments and likes.

Here’s to a new 2011.

Touchscreen or keyboard?


As designers add tactile touchscreen interfaces to devices, some debate the ease of use.

Some users suffer from limited tactile sense control. Others struggle with the smaller size of the visual keys. Still others need the audible and tactile feedback from hardware keys.

Would these hacks solve those user interface problems?

Discovered at socialjunjun.typepad.com/.

Tips for Photographing a Conference


captured-geewhizkidSchwarzenfeld Photography guest-posted a great entry at Digital Photography School’s site on tips for shooting conferences.

Tips include knowing the agenda, changing your point of view, and taking the must-have shots.

I happen to agree with many of the points, and engaged in some conversation regarding the topic.
Read the entry at DPS.

The power of sticky notes


stickiesWhen a  team asks me to join in a brainstorming session, and the first thing I see is someone with a notepad trying to capture all their thoughts, I always find a way to have them change to sticky notes and a large wall space. Why?
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Team huddle shakes up boring meetings


How are your team meetings?

  • Do they drag on endlessly while your staff watch the clock, aware that work isn’t getting done?
  • Does the staff leave the meetings no closer to producing results than when they came into the meeting?
  • Does the staff leave the meeting unsure of team priorities and “TOP 3” targets for the day or for the week?
  • Does the meeting leave the team’s morale downward at the meeting?

If your team meetings need a kick in the seat of the pants, try something radical, like a structured team huddle. Watch the video of a team huddle and find the six key parts of the huddle.

Quit acting like a nerd


“You’re acting like a nerd again.”

I’ve heard that once or twice. This week.

It reminded me that I’ve been called a nerd, a geek, and a dork at various moments in my life.

I’ll assume that many of you are not as accustomed to being called one of those terms as I am. Or perhaps you wondered which of them you should call me at a given moment.

I’ve got the quintessential answer to your question:

“What’s the difference between a geek, a nerd, and a dork?”

This comparison table should help define, describe, and differentiate the three terms.

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10 Errors that Drive Me Crazy


Not another list of 10! This one from “Chip’s Blog,” of MacGregor Literary, captures errors that drive an editor crazy.
Chip

My favorite is list item number five.

Worthy of more than a quick retweet, this entry found its way to me on Twitter, thanks to Susannah W Freeman, WriteitSideways.

PowerPoint Comedy of Errors


UPDATE 2010: Don McMillan updated his comedy bit for 2010! (first posted in 2007…)

How many errors can you find in this PowerPoint show? Making the rounds on video sites is Don McMillan’s clever presentation, Life after Death by Powerpoint.
Did you spot the

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How to say “I am sorry” to a designer


sorry.jpgI found this in my Stumbleupon wanderings:

swiss-miss.com/2010/02/im-sorry.html

Clever. Inside joke? Not if you use Windows shortcuts. Your designer will appreciate it.

Oh, it’s Command+Z to the designer, most likely a Mac user.

The art of the focal point


“Every good design needs a focal point.” Garr Reynolds begins in this meaty blog post.

Explaining “Tokonoma,” Garr moves from the Japanese architectural and cultural explanation, into the realm of practical application in—of all things—presentations. He takes the real-life, explains the concepts, and turns them back into the real life.

Brilliantly depicting before and after examples of presentation images, Garr shows examples that my most-practical and literal-minded followers can swallow.

I encourge you to apply the principles if you do any of the following:

  • create presentations and training visuals
  • design living spaces or workspaces
  • create visual communications (even the most-basic e-mail!)
  • Read his post on presentationzen.com.

Mixing Old School with today’s tech


old school TV w rabbit ears

rabbit ears and clicky dials

Blending contemporary technology with old school retro designs, these 10 tech finds will take you back to an era when “network” meant three channels and there was a USA but not a USB.
Posted on Mashable.
Hmmm, would you stand three inches over and hold onto the right antenna? Ahh, there.

E-mail signature blocks. How to.


Kat Neville writes on Smashing Magazine “The Art and Science of the Email Signature.

Nice work. Too many of my friends and coworkers have loaded down their signatures with every number, every tagline, every graphic logo of the company, in every color in the company-approved brand palette.

Brevity. Clarity.

That’s all recipients want.

Also, if the majority of your email is sent inhouse, then create an internal signature that’s your default.

Name, Extension.

Period.

No need to tell your coworkers the name of the company you both work for, your own Web site, and monthly Marketing tagline.

Speaking of company brand, the pastel colors some companies include in their palette are instant turnoffs. Try reading this: andy gee, communication specialist